Health Information

 

Asthma:

*Coming Soon*

Diabetes:

Diabetes is a serious and potentially life threatening condition that affects an increasing number of Australia's population.

The good news is that, although it cannot be 'cured' as such, for most people diabetes is a very manageable condition.

Our GPs and nursing staff are dedicated to ensuring our patients with diabetes have the best possible quality of life. They do this with regular monitoring, diabetes reviews, and by teaming up with Allied Health staff to increase education and encourage lifestyle and diet modifications which can enable them to take control of their health.

Reliable health advice regarding diabetes can be found on the Diabetes Australia website: https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/

 

For more information about diabetes and how this condition can be managed, please click the tab below.

 

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a serious complex condition which can affect the entire body. Diabetes requires daily self care and if complications develop, diabetes can have a significant impact on quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. While there is currently no cure for diabetes, you can live an enjoyable life by learning about the condition and effectively managing it.

There are different types of diabetes; all types are complex and serious. The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes.

How does diabetes affect the body?

When someone has diabetes, their body can’t maintain healthy levels of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a form of sugar which is the main source of energy for our bodies. Unhealthy levels of glucose in the blood can lead to long term and short term health complications.

For our bodies to work properly we need to convert glucose (sugar) from food into energy. A hormone called insulin is essential for the conversion of glucose into energy. In people with diabetes, insulin is no longer produced or not produced in sufficient amounts by the body. When people with diabetes eat glucose, which is in foods such as breads, cereals, fruit and starchy vegetables, legumes, milk, yoghurt and sweets, it can’t be converted into energy.

Instead of being turned into energy the glucose stays in the blood resulting in high blood glucose levels. After eating, the glucose is carried around your body in your blood. Your blood glucose level is called glycaemia. Blood glucose levels can be monitored and managed through self care and treatment.

Three things you need to know about diabetes:

  • It is not one condition- there are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes
  • All types of diabetes are complex and require daily care and management
  • Diabetes does not discriminate, anyone can develop diabetes

Diabetes is serious

Diabetes can be managed well but the potential complications are the same for type 1 and type 2 diabetes including heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, limb amputation, depression, anxiety and blindness.

We know diabetes:

  • Is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults
  • Is a leading cause of kidney failure and dialysis
  • Increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to four times
  • Is a major cause of limb amputations
  • Affects mental health as well as physical health. Depression, anxiety and distress occur in more than 30% of all people with diabetes

Early diagnosis, optimal treatment and effective ongoing support and management reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications.

Why is diabetes increasing?

All types of diabetes are increasing in prevalence:

  • Type 1 diabetes accounts for 10% of all diabetes and is increasing
  • Type 2 diabetes accounts for 85% of all diabetes and is increasing
  • Gestational diabetes in pregnancy is increasing

Type 2 diabetes is increasing at the fastest rate. There are large numbers of people with silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes which may be damaging their bodies. An estimated 2 million Australians are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and are already showing early signs of the condition.

Type 2 diabetes is one of the major consequences of the obesity epidemic. The combination of massive changes to diet and the food supply, combined with massive changes to physical activity with more sedentary work and less activity, means most populations are seeing more type 2 diabetes.

Genes also play a part with higher risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese, South Asian, Indian, Pacific Islander and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

Symptoms

In type 1 diabetes, symptoms are often sudden and can be life-threatening; therefore it is usually diagnosed quite quickly. In type 2 diabetes, many people have no symptoms at all, while other signs can go unnoticed being seen as part of ‘getting older’.

Therefore, by the time symptoms are noticed, complications of diabetes may already be present.

Common symptoms include:

  • Being more thirsty than usual
  • Passing more urine
  • Feeling tired and lethargic
  • Always feeling hungry
  • Having cuts that heal slowly
  • Itching, skin infections
  • Blurred vision
  • Unexplained weight loss (type 1)
  • Gradually putting on weight (type 2)
  • Mood swings
  • Headaches
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Leg cramps

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

 

Information sourced from https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/what-is-diabetes and accurate as of 13/12/2018

Yellow Fever:

Yellow fever is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes which is prevalent in Africa, and Central and South America. Thankfully there is a vaccine available for Yellow Fever.

If you intend to travel to or through these areas you'll need a valid Yellow Fever Certificate.

Deer Park Medical Centre is proud to be a Certified Yellow Fever Clinic, so you can book in with one of our experienced GPs to get this vaccine and receive your certificate.

 

Please note that the Yellow Fever Certificate will only become valid 10 DAYS AFTER ADMINISTRATION OF VACCINE, so make sure to book in well before you intend to travel to avoid issues while traveling and when returning from a country at risk of Yellow Fever transmission.

 

For more information about Yellow Fever and traveling to/from Yellow Fever risk countries, please see the below links:

Australian Government Department of Health: http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/health-pubhlth-strateg-communic-factsheets-yellow.htm

World Health Organization (WHO): https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/yellow-fever

 

 

Address: T97 Brimbank Shopping Centre (next to Woolworth and Direct Chemist Outlet)
28-72 Neale Road, Deer Park, VIC 3023